Collaborative divorce is an alternative method for couples facing divorce.  Through the collaborative process, spouses pledge to resolve all issues without court intervention.  In a collaborative divorce, spouses focus on settlement with the goal to minimize the negative economic, social, and emotional consequences that families face in the traditional adversarial divorce process. In a traditional…

Not all divorces have to (or should) go to court.  Rather, spouses may find that an alternative to litigation will serve them better both during and after the divorce process.  In family law related matters, Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) processes, such as mediation or collaborative law have risen greatly in popularity in the last 20…

Collaborative divorce is an alternative method for couples facing divorce.  Through the collaborative process, spouses pledge to resolve all issues without court intervention. The Collaborative Divorce Team A unique feature of the collaborative divorce process is that spouses will work with specially trained and skilled professionals to reach a fair negotiated settlement, while avoiding the…

While most family law cases in Nebraska are heard exclusively by Nebraska district courts, a small number of family law cases are instead heard by district court referees, often referred to as child support referees. Who is a District Court Referee? District court referees are attorneys who have been appointed by Nebraska courts to provide…

Nearly all phases of your divorce will be accompanied by timelines providing when certain actions must be taken or prohibiting certain actions from being taken. The following are some common timelines to help you decipher what must be done during your divorce and when. Mandatory waiting period What is it? Under Nebraska law, no divorce…

A divorce decree is a court order that officially ends a marriage. In doing so, the decree defines the division of property between spouses, awards legal and physical custody of minor children, and states whether either spouse owes a child support obligation. Most decrees are written by attorneys, capturing the settlement agreements reached between spouses….

There may be times during your divorce when you are asked to testify in the courtroom. “Testify” means to answer questions under oath. Before you testify in open court, you will be sworn in as a witness, meaning you swear (or affirm) to tell the truth. The thought of being on the witness stand and…

To divide many types of retirement accounts in a divorce, federal law requires that special court orders called Qualified Domestic Relations Orders be submitted and approved by the court. This order, referred to as a QDRO, provides instructions to a retirement plan administrator on how to divide funds from a retirement account after a divorce…

A settlement conference can be a powerful tool for the resolution of your case. It is a meeting held with you, your spouse, and your lawyers with the intention of negotiating the terms of your divorce. Settlement conferences are most effective when both parties and their attorneys see the potential for a negotiated resolution and…

For divorced parents operating under the provisions of a parenting plan, a need may arise to ask a court to revisit the plan because certain provisions are either antiquated or not working. For example: Parenting time provisions no longer apply because our children are no longer in daycare. The right of first refusal has become…