If you get divorced in Nebraska, you must wait six months after your divorce is final before you can re-marry. If you are contemplating getting married after divorce, you may have some questions about what will happen. Below are answers to common questions about remarriage after divorce: Does remarriage affect child support? No. When calculating…

Throughout the divorce process, you or your attorney may have disagreed with some of the rulings the judge made. The following are the most common post-trial actions to consider if your case proceeded to trial and you believe the judge erred in the final decision. Motion for New Trial After your trial is complete and…

After a divorce has become final, problems can arise between former spouses in complying with the terms of their divorce. For example: My former spouse is not following our parenting plan. My former spouse has not transferred property as ordered in our divorce decree. My former spouse refuses to pay child support or alimony. To…

Did you know that you can change your name back to your former name in your divorce? Nebraska law allows for former names (sometimes referred to as “maiden name”) to be restored in a divorce. If you wish to have your former name restored, here’s what you need to know. Include the request to have…

To ensure a smooth transition into your post-divorce new normal, your Koenig│Dunne team has identified the following important actions for you to take: Informational filing.  If support (child support and/or alimony) has been ordered in your case, Nebraska law requires you to provide the clerk of the court with your address, telephone number, social security…

  To divide many types of retirement accounts in a divorce, federal law requires that special court orders called Qualified Domestic Relations Orders be submitted and approved by the court. This order, referred to as a QDRO, provides instructions to a retirement plan administrator on how to divide funds from a retirement account after a…

Your divorce may result in the court ordering two types of support payments – child support and/or alimony. One way to ensure court-ordered is paid in full is to request the payor (the person ordered to pay support) to maintain a life insurance policy. The recipient should be named the beneficiary of the policy and…

  In Nebraska, there are two levels of appellate courts. The intermediate level is the Nebraska Court of Appeals. In family law cases, a person will first file an appeal with the Nebraska Court of Appeals. After that appeal is decided, and you believe the Nebraska Court of Appeals was also wrong in its ruling,…

  If the judge made major decisions following your trial with which you seriously disagree, you may consider an appeal to the Nebraska Court of Appeals. People can appeal when they believe the judge made a mistake or misinterpreted the law as it pertains to the facts. Whatever the reasons for the court’s rulings, you…

Retirement accounts are often one of the most valuable marital assets to be divided in a divorce. Regardless of whose name is on the account, retirement funds that accrued during the marriage may be divided in a divorce “Retirement accounts” encompass a variety of accounts – individual retirement accounts (IRAs), 401(k) plans, 403(b) plans, Railroad…